Project Safety Tips

  • Holiday Weekend Safety

    5/24/2013 4:48 PM

      Memorial Day Weekend marks the unofficial start to summer for many in Maryland, Virginia, and Washington DC. The three day weekend prompts all sorts of celebrations - family cookouts, neighborhood block parties and.......

  • Thompson Creek Windows Reviews Space Heater Usage and Safety

    1/25/2013 7:21 PM

    We’re seeing temperatures dip lower than they have been all winter. Many residents in Maryland, Virginia and Washington DC are scrambling to keep warm. Whether your home is older, or your windows and doors are not good at keeping out drafts, or your heating system is not operating at peak efficiency, temperatures in the teens and single digits could make your house feel like a meat freezer.   One of the quickest ways to warm up a room is a space heater, but they are certainly fuel hogs. Small space heaters can actually be less expensive to use if you only want to supplement inadequate heating in one room. They can also boost the temperature of rooms used by individuals who are sensitive to cold, such as the elderly, without overheating your entire home.

  • Summer Grilling Safety 101

    7/12/2012 12:23 PM

    Summer is a great time to grill outdoors. The taste of food cooked on a grill just can’t compare to other methods. And the added bonus is you don’t heat up your house by using your oven. Whether you use a gas or charcoal grill, there are still risks. The National Fire Protection Association reports that between 2005 and 2009, U.S. fire departments responded to an average of 8,200 home fires involving grills, hibachis or barbecues per year, including an average of 3,400 structure fires and 4,800 outside fires. These 8,200 fires caused an annual average of 15 civilian deaths, 120 civilian injuries and $75 million in direct property damage.  

  • Generator Safety Tips

    6/20/2012 2:28 PM

    For many homeowners, summer thunderstorms often mean losing power to your home. If you live in an area prone to frequent power outages, such as neighborhoods with a lot of mature trees or above ground power lines, you may find it a wise investment to purchase a portable generator.  Generators can put you at a great advantage during a loss of electricity. Generators can power refrigerators and freezers to prevent your food from spoiling, and run your HVAC system – especially important if there are young children or elderly in your home. It can power your cell phone chargers so you can maintain outside communications. They can even power a coffee maker – a necessity to some!

  • It's National Hurricane Preparedness Week! Let's Review What We Need to Know

    5/30/2012 4:35 PM

    It's that time of year. Beryl is officially the first named storm to affect this area and fortunately - she brought us much-needed rain. But we’ve seen the footage on the news of the true devastation hurricanes can cause to cities along the east coast. Some homeowners may think that living inland protects you from the worst dangers of a hurricane or tropical storm. But that’s like sticking your head in the sand. With this week being National Hurricane Preparedness Week (May 27 – June 2, 2012), now is a great time to learn more about the hazards of hurricanes and what you can do to protect your home and property.

  • Lead-Based Paint in Maryland, Virginia & Washington DC

    7/14/2011 5:00 AM

    Did you know? 87% of homes built before 1940 are likely to contain lead? 69% of homes built between 1940-1960 and 24% built from 1960-1978 are likely to contain lead? The EPA enacted the Renovation, Repair and Repainting Rule (RRP) to protect residents of homes built prior to 1978 from the dangers of lead paint. The regulations apply to any contractor that works on older homes, including renovation contractors, maintenance workers in multi-family properties, and painting contractors, as well as other trades like plumbing, flooring contractors, HVAC companies, and replacement contractors for windows, doors and siding. The RRP rule requires these contractors to give customers a pamphlet called Renovate Right and have it signed before beginning the job. Under the law, homeowners are no longer able to waive the use of lead-safe work practices in their homes. Before performing any work, the contractor must test for lead paint on surfaces to be affected by the planned work. If lead is found to be present, the contractor must perform the work using lead-safe work practices as specified in the RRP Rule. The goal is to contain lead dust during the renovation. It’s important to note that the contractor is not responsible for or required to remove the lead from the home. Contractors must document each step of the RRP rule compliance, including lead test results, licensing, and documentation showing that necessary steps were taken to perform the installation as laid out by the Rule.  

  • Cleaning Gutters is Dangerous Work

    5/11/2011 12:00 AM

      The U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission reports about 165,000 Americans require medical treatment for ladder-related injuries each year. And according to the World Health Organization, the United States leads the world in ladder deaths. Each year, there are 532,000 people injured, more than 164,000 emergency room-treated injuries and 300 deaths in the U.S. that are caused by falls from ladders. Most ladder deaths are from falls of 10 feet or less. With spring in full swing and tree buds falling from trees, are you thinking of cleaning out your gutters? Be careful. Better yet, replace your gutters with Thompson Creek’s gutter system and you will never worry about clogged gutters again. Our gutter system is guaranteed never to clog or pull away from your home, and is backed by our double lifetime guarantee.  

  • Lead Safe Work Practices

    5/4/2011 12:00 AM

      The EPA enacted the Renovation, Repair and Repainting Rule (RRP) to protect residents of homes built prior to 1978 from the dangers of lead paint. The regulations apply to any contractor that works on older homes, including renovation contractors, maintenance workers in multi-family properties, and painting contractors, as well as other trades like plumbing, flooring contractors, HVAC companies, and replacement contractors for windows, doors and siding. The RRP rule requires these contractors to give customers a pamphlet called Renovate Right and have it signed before beginning the job. Under the law, homeowners are no longer able to waive the use of lead-safe work practices in their homes. Before performing any work, the contractor must test for lead paint on surfaces to be affected by the planned work. If lead is found to be present, the contractor must perform the work using lead-safe work practices as specified in the RRP Rule. The goal is to contain lead dust during the renovation. It’s important to note that the contractor is not responsible for or required to remove the lead from the home. Contractors must document each step of the RRP rule compliance, including lead test results, licensing, and documentation showing that necessary steps were taken to perform the installation as laid out by the Rule. Over the past year, many replacement window companies have been slapped with heavy fines for failing to meet some or all of the above requirements. While it requires a lot of work and oversight for contractors to ensure each step is followed, it's not only a necessary precaution but a federal law. If the rules are not followed, the law is broken. When deciding on which contractor to hire for a renovation project, make sure they inform you of their lead-safe practices and adherence to the RRP rule.  

  • Lead-Based Paint in Older Homes

    4/21/2011 12:00 AM

      Last year, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) implemented a law that’s been in the works for almost 20 years. The Renovation, Repair and Repainting Rule (RRP) was enacted to protect residents of older homes from the dangers of lead paint. Although lead is harmful to everyone, it’s particularly dangerous for children under six as it has been linked to birth defects and learning disabilities. Many homes that were built before 1978 contain lead-based paint. In fact, the EPA estimates that about 50% of homes built prior to 1978 contain lead paint. To protect homeowners, the RRP rule places regulations on any contractor that works on older homes, including renovation contractors, maintenance workers in multi-family properties, and painting contractors, as well as other trades like plumbing, flooring contractors, HVAC companies, and replacement contractors for windows, doors and siding. These companies must comply with the law and become EPA-certified, or face fines of up to $37,500 per incident per day. The EPA has set forth clear guidelines regarding safety, containment, clean-up and documentation that the trained certified installers must follow. When deciding on which contractor to hire for a renovation project, make sure they inform you of their lead-safe practices and adherence to the RRP rule.  

  • Gutter Cleaning Can Be Unsafe

    3/4/2011 12:00 AM

      The U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission reports about 165,000 Americans require medical treatment for ladder-related injuries each year. And according to the World Health Organization, the United States leads the world in ladder deaths. Each year, there are 532,000 people injured, more than 164,000 emergency room-treated injuries and 300 deaths in the U.S. that are caused by falls from ladders. Most ladder deaths are from falls of 10 feet or less. With spring right around the corner, are you thinking of cleaning out your gutters? Be careful. Better yet, replace your gutters with Thompson Creek’s gutter system and you will never worry about clogged gutters again. Our gutter system is guaranteed never to clog or pull away from your home, and is backed by our double lifetime guarantee.  See why Thompson Creek's gutter system has eliminated clogged gutters and kept homeowners in Maryland, DC and Virginia safe from ladder injuries.  

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